My TBR List

Here is an updated version in no particular order of my TBR list (as of March 2017).  See my Review Index for 20122013,  20142015 and 2016 for a list of what I’ve read so far since I started writing this blog.

Books which are currently sitting on my shelves/Kindle:
 
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Scoop by Evelyn Waugh
Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
Zazie dans le metro by Raymond Queneau
The Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolano
Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie
The Children’s Book by A.S. Byatt
Untold Stories by Alan Bennett
On The Road by Jack Kerouac
Day by A. L. Kennedy
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
Brick Lane by Monica Ali
In The Kitchen by Monica Ali
The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai
England, England by Julian Barnes
The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery
Hard Boiled Wonderland and the Rest of the World by Haruki Murakami
Night Train to Lisbon by Pascal Mercier
The Uninvited Guests by Sadie Jones
The World According to Garp by John Irving
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
A Widow for One Year by John Irving
In One Person by John Irving
Last Night in Twisted River by John Irving
MaddAdam by Margaret Atwood
The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy
The Aftermath by Rhidian Brooks
The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
Blood and Beauty by Sarah Dunant
The Sportswriter by Richard Ford
The Innocent by Ian McEwan
The Cement Garden by Ian McEwan
Emotionally Weird by Kate Atkinson
Empire Falls by Richard Russo
The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller
The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng
The Gift of Rain by Tan Twan Eng
Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter
The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman
The Folding Star by Alan Hollinghurst
The Island by Victoria Hislop
Tigers in Red Weather by Liza Klaussmann
The Pure in Heart by Susan Hill
Norwegian by Night by Derek B. Miller
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce
Perfect by Rachel Joyce
The Universe versus Alex Woods by Gavin Extence
The Kills by Richard House
Autobiography by Morrissey
The Son by Philipp Meyer
What is the What by Dave Eggers
Zeitoun by Dave Eggers
Little Failure by Gary Shteyngart
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
Wake by Anna Hope
Lost at Sea by Jon Ronson
Cover Her Face by P. D. James
Wilkie Collins by Peter Ackroyd
Ghosting by Jennie Erdal
Paradises by Iosi Havilio
Three Women in a Mirror by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt
Anonymity by John Mullan
Stone Mattress: Nine Tales by Margaret Atwood
The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood
Travelling with Infinity: My Life with Stephen by Jane Hawking
Doctors Dissected by Jane Haynes and Martin Scurr
Appointment with Yesterday by Celia Fremlin
Portrait of the Mother as a Young Woman by Friedrich Christian Delius
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari
Nothing is True and Everything is Possible: Adventures in Modern Russia by Peter Pomerantsev
David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell
A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James
All for Nothing by Walter Kempowski
The Road to Little Dribbling: More Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson
The Tiger’s Wife by Tea Obreht
Cold Earth by Sarah Moss
Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall
Parliament: The Biography Volume 1 and 2 by Chris Bryant
Sweet Caress by William Boyd
Mothering Sunday by Graham Swift
Eviction by Matthew Desmond
Bricks and Mortar by Clemens Meyer
Compass by Mathias Enard
 
Other books I want to read (but do not have copies of… yet)
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
Wild Swans by Jung Chang
Your Fathers, Where Are They? And the Prophets, Do They Live Forever? by Dave Eggers
On Writers and Writing by Margaret Atwood
The Transmigration of Bodies by Yuri Herrara
Dancing in the Dark by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Some Rain Must Fall by Karl Ove Knausgaard
The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon
Purity by Jonathan Franzen
Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was by Sjón
Commonwealth by Ann Patchett
Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami
East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity by Philippe Sands
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance
The Women Who Shaped Politics by Sophy Ridge
Admissions by Henry Marsh
The Joy of Quiz by Alan Connor
How to Survive a Plague by David France
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
Fresh Complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides
Winter by Ali Smith
The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill
 
 
 

50 responses to “My TBR List

  1. I stupidly got out Anna Karenina & War and Peace at the same time. Freaked myself out & didn’t read either. I purchased Anna Karenina on audible.com so I’m looking forward to getting a long classic off my list!

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  2. I’ve read most of these myself: The Kite Runner and Birdsong are both incredibly special books, beautifully written. Enjoy another year of incredible literature, judging on this list!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Melissa Burklow

    This is definitely not a “stupidly” long list. I’ve read most of them and they’re all really great! If I may add one to your list, The Long Ships by Frans Bengtsson. It is a fantastic piece of historic fiction.

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  4. An impressive and bold list! Some of them are true masterpieces, and some of them are tantalizing. I wish we had 26 hours instead of 24:-)

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  5. Yes, I also haven’t read too many ‘classics’, but you’re correct those always seem to be on lists of books that need to be read. I may read Anna Karenina this year. Nice list you have.

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  6. Thanks for stopping by my blog and liking my post on Anna Karenina. I’m sure you’ll be amazed, too!! 😉

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  7. Great list. Lots of these are either on my list to get to soon or are favorites. Looking forward to the reviews. All my fellow Brown U alums have read and really liked The Marriage Plot, and I have it somewhere (Kindle? Audio on my phone?) but it does’t fit any of my insane reading challenge goals at the moment, so it will probably wait til next year when I will not only be reading my way around the world, but also around the 50 US states. Am subscribing to your blog, so I will be back. Are you on Goodreads? You’d love some of the groups I am in there.

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  8. The God Of Small Things is beautifully written but rather bleak. There’s a review on my blog.

    I was rather disappointed by Fahrenheit 451 – it just didn’t live up to the hype.

    BTW this list is so much shorter than mine would be so don’t sweat it!

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  9. I love your blog, crisp and clean. Reading list looks like some of my favorites, too.

    Carol Colitti Levine
    thesidetrek

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  10. Enjoyed your Reading List – you’re going to be busy! ‘Cold Comfor Farm’ one of my best reads ever; ‘Marriage Plot’ – recently read and didn’t enjoy; ‘Brick Lane’ – have tried 3 times to read this & failed. Have now crossed it off my list. You can’t win ’em all! So many books to rad, and so little time ….

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  11. Anna Kerenina may be a monster of a novel but it is by far one of the greatest master pieces of literature. Another book I would highly recommend reading is Margaret Mitchell’s ‘Gone with the Wind’.

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  12. I’d recommend The God of Small Things. It’s my most recent read of those on this list, and very moving.

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  13. Livvy @Nerdy Book Reviews

    Birdsong and The Picture of Dorian Grey. Faulks really just throws you into the middle of everything and it really discombobulates you to reflect the war scenes. Then the switching back and forth from future to past adds to the connection between the past and present to potray his moral message. It’s rather good.
    Whilst The Picture of Dorian Grey is certainly a gothic classic that has a really sinister edge. I found it entertaining to read and Lord Harry was definitely a character with some cracking quotes!

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  14. The Picture of Dorian Grey – you have to read this very soon! One of my favourites 🙂

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  15. Hello,
    I couldn’t help playing a little game with the bookshelf photo at the top of your blog – counting how many of the books I have read. I make it 4 out of 14 (though Adrian Mole’s diary was a very long time ago…).

    About your booklist, Midnight’s Children is my own favourite. Strangely, I decided to stop reading American Psycho after only a few pages (I normally finish every book I start); I realised it was going to be too nasty.

    Jasper

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  16. Suggestion: Don’t even consider War and Peace in the near future (at least not until you’re really, really, really into Russian and Classics) and read Anna Karenina after you read The Picture of Dorian Gray. Both are incredible, but since Oscar Wilde’s is shorter it might not be as intimidating to start with. Though I’ve read a good share of classics, Anna Karenina is one of my favorite books of all time.

    Brave New World and Farenheit 451 are also definitely worth reading.

    Good luck! If you tackle one every one or two weeks you’ll be done next year. =)

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  17. mylifeinrouge

    I want to read the WIlkie Collins & Salman Rushdie book too 🙂 Thanks for checking out my blog. PS, audreyzworld… I have Farenheit 451 on my to read list 🙂

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  18. Great book blog! will definitely follow 🙂

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  19. ninja2188

    Thanks for checking out my post! Hard-boiled Wonderland and the end of the world is one of my favorites of Haruki Murakami’s! I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

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  20. I really like your list. I have some of those on my TBR list too. I wonder why I end up reading other books instead of the ones I said I’d read? Sometimes I resist what I’m supposed to do. Thanks for stopping by my blog.

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  21. A great reading list. I’m reading Sweet Tooth and am really enjoying it.

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  22. welloflostplots

    Great to see some Murakami on your list – I’m obsessed with his novels.

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  23. Im reading Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children now…truly an intriguing read..U must absolutely read God of Small Things. A really beautiful read. I myself am planning to get back to it one of these days 🙂

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  24. ” Life: A User’s Manuel ” Interesting name. I guess something like Siddharta or The Alchemist, Self-discovery stuff. Ain’t it?

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    • Wow! You are way off base but the original title might make it more clear: La vie mode d’emploi (although Bello’s revised translation [the original translation with a few corrections] is superb). Perec was a member of OULIPO and La vie mode d’emploi is a huge verbal puzzle that should not be missed and is a serious contender for the best novel of the 20th Century. It is not a self-discovery book.

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  25. I’ve read many of these books, although I have my own to read pile which is huge, and continually growing, and I’d say stop what you are doing right now to read “The God of Small Things” Possibly one of the most poetic books I’ve ever read. The prose alone is enough. BIrdsong haunts me too. Looking forward to reading your reviews!

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  26. bean's book blog

    Of your TBR list, these are the ones I’ve read that I highly recommend:

    One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest: Ken Kesey
    On The Road: Jack Kerouac
    The Bell Jar: Sylvia Plath
    The Elegance of the Hedgehog: Muriel Barbery

    And these are the ones also on my TBR list that I never seem to get to:
    Anna Karenina: Leo Tolstoy
    Crime and Punishment: Fyodor Dostoevsky
    England, England: Julian Barnes

    The rest of your list are books I’m not familiar with (there are many) and some that I’ve read but didn’t care for. It’s a great list. I’ll put several of them on my own TBR list.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Pingback: My Reading List of Japanese Literature | Japan Kaleidoskop

  28. ‘American Psycho’ is one of my favourite books of all time – so cleverly written. It messes with your head…
    Enjoy!

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    • I absolutely agree. American Psycho is mostly rejected for all the things that it is not (how many readers put the book down because it was too violent?). It’s strengths, unfortunately, are generally missed by the surface reader who doesn’t stop to reflect on the fiction. There are those that “get it” and those that “don’t get it.” It is a great book and a triumph for its author.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Thanks for stopping by my blog, I love your ambition – inspiring! Any suggestions for my own summer reading list?

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  30. Thanks for liking my post! Tea and books are my favourite things so it’s great to follow someone with similar tastes 🙂 x

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  31. I’ve just read a bunch of books also on your to-read-not-yet-acquired list. Loved Gone Girl and Where’d You Go, Bernadette.

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  32. Long and nice list! I read a few of them. I’ll wait for your reviews on them! 🙂

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  33. Wilkie Collins and Edith Wharton are great. Also highly recommend “The Moonstone” (Collins) and “The Buccaneers” (Wharton). Like you don’t have enough to get through… 🙂

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  34. Cracking list of books and I’ll definitely be adding some of those to my wishlist! I can definitely recommend Blood and Beauty. Took a while to get going but worth the wait!

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  35. These are all very good! Especially Master and Margarita which is one of my all-time favorite novels and the Tolstoys and Dostoevskys (which are somewhat my thing). Also love Arundhati Roy. I’m not so sure if Jung Chang’s Wild Swans can provide a real understanding of Mao’s China though. Pao Yu-Ching’s Revolution and Counter-Revolution, William Hinton’s Fanshen: A Documentary of Revolution in a Chinese Village, Dongping Han’s The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village, and Mobo Gao’s The Battle for China’s Past, among others, should do a better job.

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  36. Pingback: The 2013 End of Year Book Survey | A Little Blog of Books and Other Stuff

  37. NICE! I love to see others whose aspirations for the year include polishing up their knowledge of books! wow! I’ll be interested to see some of your book reviews on some of these books.

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  38. thank you for liking my first post! your reading list is inspiring, many of them are on my list too, looking forward to hearing your reviews 🙂

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  39. Oh, some great looking books on this list… Of those that I have read, I particularly loved Anna Karenina, On The Road, and The Bell Jar.

    If you are ever looking for other books to add to this noble list (such as suggestions for when people ask you what you want for Christmas!) you might be interested in taking a look at the books that I have most enjoyed, on my blog: http://novelreading.wordpress.com

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  40. The Bell Jar is probably one of my favourite books ever. On The Road was also a good read. I can’t find time to read Master and Margarita and I’ve heard it’s also worth reading.

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  41. The Light Between Oceans is almost top of TBR plus The Bell Jar, great list!

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Are you going to read all those in a year?
    That’s so impressive!
    I’ve started reading one book a week for a few months but how can you read so many books?
    Any tips please?

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    • I think it’s going to take me at least 2 years to read all of these – and I keep adding books to it! I do most of my reading while travelling to work by train which takes about an hour each way. It definitely helps if you set time aside regularly!

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  43. EnglishLitGeek

    awesome list!

    Liked by 1 person

  44. Impressive list! In May, my book club is going to be reading Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance. I’ve already put a hold on the audio version in OverDrive because there are already 50 people ahead of me for 4 copies! The description reminds me of The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, which I highly recommend reading as well.

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